If we were never challenged in multitasking before, we surely were this week!

It’s pretty fascinating that when EVERYTHING is due at once, how you manage to get it ALL done, one-time, and without error (pats self on the back).

While some find it distracting and annoying, others find multitasking as a welcomed challenge. As admins, we THRIVE in it. We’ve learned to adapt to this skill set and plied our way through the madness of it all with high productivity and minimum stress.  So with that being said, we want to dispel the common 4 roadblocks and provide detours on how to navigate your way to becoming a successful multitasker:

Roadblock 1: ”But everything is a priority!”

Detour: Everything may be a priority, but it doesn’t have to be completed all at once. At the very beginning of your day, create your task list based on the order of necessity. We like to focus on our “Top 5” every day. Out of all the things that you need to do, what are your “Top 5” tasks that HAVE to get done? Take a closer look and we’re pretty sure you’ll find that some of those “pressing issues” can wait. Remember: every task should be scaled based on the rule necessity. Whatever you didn’t complete, forward it to the next day.

Roadblock 2: “Emails come first!”

Detour: Actually, emails come last. If you spend all your time answering emails, how do you expect to get any work done throughout the day? Spend only 15 minutes/3 times per day responding to emails. The rest of your time should be focused on completing the task at hand. You wouldn’t have to keep answering those “How are you coming along on the report? When do you expect to have it completed?” emails, because you’ll actually finish the report…

Roadblock 3: “It’s my responsibility to help everyone all the time.”

Detour: It’s noble, but not very productive. Listen, helping others is something we all should do, however, there are limits to everything. If you work with peers who showcase a lackluster work ethic or feel it’s your responsibility to take ownership of every pressing issue, chances are your productivity will decrease and your stress levels will increase. Pull back a little bit.

Help your peers by leading them to those user manuals that have been collecting dust on their desk with all those “how-to’s” in it. Make quick suggestions to encourage accountability like, “Oh yeah, we covered that in last week’s meeting. You should check the meeting notes, I’m sure you’ll find it in there.” Things can be said directly, yet politely to your peers without making them feel demeaned. (Watch your sarcastic tone.)  And if you’re in management, it may be time for a one-on-one to evaluate their performances to help employees increase their productivity and personal development.

Roadblock 4: “I’m a procrastinator by nature.”

If you’re a procrastinator, chances are you didn’t even read this blog in its entirety.

Detour: Go back to the top and read the blog and apply what we suggested. It’s really useful.

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